The State of GDPR: Publishers’ Questions Answered

This article originally appeared in AdMonsters on December 19, 2017.


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Data privacy and legal compliance experts agree: GDPR is too big to ignore. As an ad/revenue operations (ops), you should already know the E.U.’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into effect in May, 2018. What’s actually new in this story? Valid point. Despite months—possibly years—of preparation, publishers still have questions about GDPR’s implications, some of them pretty basic: Will this apply to our business? What do we need to do to become compliant? What kind of enforcement is expected? Can we just cross our fingers and ignore it?

The answers to these questions lie in every digital publisher’s ecosystem. GDPR affects any entity worldwide that digitally targets or monitors people in the E.U. This means knowing what’s happening in your digital environment, from vendors executing to data tracking. If knowing your digital partners doesn’t appeal as a basic business practice, then maybe the fines for violating GDPR will (maxing out at 20 million euro or 4% of the company’s global revenue, whichever is higher).

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10 Easy-to-Keep Resolutions for Safe Online Shopping

This article by Pat Ciavolella, Head of Malware Desk and Analytics at The Media Trust, was originally published in Fraud & Identity Today on December 18, 2017.

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Let’s admit it; online shopping can sometimes feel like junk food – it’s really good when you “virtual window-shop” but there is some element of guilt when you finally decide to splurge. Unfortunately, just like junk food binges can harm your health, online shopping can hurt you, too—malware and stolen card details are just the tip of the iceberg!

There is proof in the pudding: 2017 bore witness to several unsettling examples of ecommerce website attacks. In the Spring, at least 25 reputable, mid-tier ecommerce sites were compromised to steal customer payment card details. Then, six months later it was revealed that some of the world’s popular websites—a list that includes several brand-name retailers—were found recording your every keystroke.

Experiencing the effects of a digital compromise is a likely prospect for the average online shopper; it’s no longer something that only occurs during high-volume shopping periods or on dodgy websites. According to Adobe Analytics, online sales hit a record-breaking $6.59 billion on Cyber Monday, up 16.8 percent from 2016. How much of these record-breaking online sales were safe for you as a consumer? Good question. But, in preparation for 2018, everyone can resolve to be more vigilant.

A good first step is following these 10 easy-to-keep resolutions to protect your online shopping adventures:

 1. Judge loyalty programs: treat as guilty until proven innocent!

Read the fine print when signing up for loyalty programs that enable you to take advantage of additional discounts. Many retailers share your personal information with industry partners to promote seemingly complementary products, but the security of your personal data is not guaranteed.

2. Be a grammar guru: make sure URLs are spelled correctly

Domain spoofing is a widespread issue. It is easy to get enticed by a deal for a new gadget only to end up shopping on a completely fake website that has purposely been setup to entice and trick users, e.g., vs. Also, pay close attention to grammar and spelling on various pages of the website, too. It’s easy to accidentally navigate off a legitimate site to a spoofed site.

3. Do a little detective work: check brand legitimacy

While shopping online, chances are, you are looking at multiple brands of goods. Before hitting the buy button, verify if the brand has a legitimate website, physical address and customer reviews before you splurge. Again, it doesn’t hurt to continuously keep an eye out for spelling errors on the url/domain and also general website text grammar. It’s unlikely a reputable brand would accidentally have these types of errors.

4. Build a routine: change passwords, often

This basic security practice is one that many consumers need to adopt. Changing passwords often, possibly a weekly or monthly basis, and creating strong passwords is important. And, no, your birthday isn’t a good password.

5. Seek trouble: with the payment page

Did you see an error message popup on the payment page? Or, did an error message flash just after you hit submit on your order? Chances are, there is something amiss and threat actors are trying to steal your payment card information. For the most part, the payment page should look “clean”, mimic other pages and contain minimal text – it shouldn’t have too many images, ads or other offers.

6. Confirm credibility: check for security certificates

Review the website’s security certificates, especially those on the payment page. While there is no guarantee that these certificates protect against a website attack, you at least want the ecommerce platform to meet industry security best practices around online payments, e.g., comply with PCI DSS standards.

7. Be perceptive: watch out for abnormal website behavior

Redirects, ad overload, ads that auto-refresh continuously, videos or images that take too long to load could signal some kind of trouble, possibly a compromise. Leave the site immediately by closing the tab and/or browser; you may even want to power off your device.

8. Work on reflexes: steer clear of fake updates and surveys

If the webpage displays a survey promising more discounts on completion or prompts you to update a plugin/ software, close the page down as quickly as possible. These are typical ploys to facilitate phishing or exploit kit drops. Don’t fall for it; some of these “you’ve won” scenarios ask an endless stream of user-identifying questions with a promise of a reward at the end. The reward never appears. Exit the browser right away!

9. Don’t walk and shop: mobile isn’t always safe

You might think you are better off shopping on your mobile phone, but carried-targeted malware is on the rise. This malware is only triggered if a person is visiting an infected website through a mobile device using data, i.e., the malware will not drop if you are on a secure Wi-Fi network.

10. Develop reading habits: start with privacy policies

Learn a little bit more about how cookies are used, how information about you is either shared or protected.


High Court Ruling That Could Reverberate Around the World

U.K. and EU flags

This article first appeared in Corporate Compliance Insights on December 18, 2017

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In a precedent-setting move, the High Court in the United Kingdom (U.K.) ruled that a company is liable for data breaches caused by employees, shedding insight into the future of data privacy regulatory enforcement. The speed and flexibility of today’s digital world require the adoption of risk strategies that address not only employee behavior but also the vendors executing on enterprise websites and mobile apps. The changing regulatory environment mandates better control of these digital assets and the role they play in collecting, storing and sharing consumer data.

CPO: US Federal Websites in Urgent Need of Web Security Upgrade

Article originally published in CPO Magazine on December 8, 2017

CPO Mag - US-federal-websites-2017-1208

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The U.S. Federal Government is a behemoth that touches every aspect of American life – and today the touchpoints for services and information that each U.S. citizen requires to comply with federal rules and regulations are increasingly found on the Internet. However, the latest report on the state of federal websites indicates that they fail on some key indicators regarding web security.

The problem with federal – and many enterprise – websites is that no one individual is in charge of the entire website operation.

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CSO Blog: Web-based Malware Not up to Code

Article first published to CSO Blog via IDG Contributor network on November 20, 2017

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Enterprises not actively managing this third-party digital risk face significant harm in the current regulatory environment around data compliance.

Recent website attacks shattered the misconception that only disreputable or typically blacklisted websites such as gambling, or porn suffered from poor security, but this isn’t true. Throughout 2017, the media reported security incidents occurring on numerous well-known, highly-trafficked websites like Equifax, State of Ohio, hundreds of U.S. public school systems and numerous embassies and government entities around Washington, DC

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MarTech Today: Companies are afraid of everyone’s website but their own


Article appeared in MarTech Today, Nov. 16, 2017

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The Media Trust CEO: Most of what happens on your web site is not controlled by you

And this third-party code, says Chris Olson, results in dozens of cookies for each user, security vulnerabilities and performance hits.


PODCAST: Malvertising and Fake News


The front page of a newspaper with the headline “Fake News” which illustrates the current phenomena. Front section of newspaper is on top of loosely stacked remainder of newspaper. All visible text is authored by the photographer. Photographed in a studio setting on a white background with a slight wide angle lens.

Charles Tendell from The Charles Tendell show interviews Chris Olson, CEO of The Media Trust, about fake news and its presence in the digital ecosystem.

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Fake news and the spread of disinformation has been tied to influencing the 2016 U.S. national election via the use of fake accounts (organic) & digital advertising (synthetic/paid) promotion channels. The primary drivers are:

  • Programmatic ad buying, enables serving of millions of ads every minute
  • Targeting tools accurately & dynamically serve ads to client-defined target markets
  • 3rd party service providers, which websites rely on for a myriad of different service providers and technologies to serve ads to their site visitors

The key to addressing fake news is driving transparency into the inner workings of the digital ecosystem. This requires media and other website operators to:

  • Know your customer, aka advertising buyer or content contributor
  • Communicate your digital asset policy to these customers; political ads, data privacy, security
  • Analyze their activity and evaluate compliance with your digital asset policy
  • Block and resolve non-compliant activity by going to the source of the violation