MarTech Today: Companies are afraid of everyone’s website but their own

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Article appeared in MarTech Today, Nov. 16, 2017

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The Media Trust CEO: Most of what happens on your web site is not controlled by you

And this third-party code, says Chris Olson, results in dozens of cookies for each user, security vulnerabilities and performance hits.

 

PODCAST: Malvertising and Fake News

fake-news

The front page of a newspaper with the headline “Fake News” which illustrates the current phenomena. Front section of newspaper is on top of loosely stacked remainder of newspaper. All visible text is authored by the photographer. Photographed in a studio setting on a white background with a slight wide angle lens.

Charles Tendell from The Charles Tendell show interviews Chris Olson, CEO of The Media Trust, about fake news and its presence in the digital ecosystem.

Listen now

Fake news and the spread of disinformation has been tied to influencing the 2016 U.S. national election via the use of fake accounts (organic) & digital advertising (synthetic/paid) promotion channels. The primary drivers are:

  • Programmatic ad buying, enables serving of millions of ads every minute
  • Targeting tools accurately & dynamically serve ads to client-defined target markets
  • 3rd party service providers, which websites rely on for a myriad of different service providers and technologies to serve ads to their site visitors

The key to addressing fake news is driving transparency into the inner workings of the digital ecosystem. This requires media and other website operators to:

  • Know your customer, aka advertising buyer or content contributor
  • Communicate your digital asset policy to these customers; political ads, data privacy, security
  • Analyze their activity and evaluate compliance with your digital asset policy
  • Block and resolve non-compliant activity by going to the source of the violation

The Honest Truth about The Honest Ads Act

Building transparency with a little upfront disclosure

Authored by Chris Olson, CEO & Co-Founder, The Media Trust

Red, white, and blue vote buttons background

The fake news furor and potential Russian involvement in the U.S. 2016 general election is reaching a fever point with multiple congressional hearings, and, digital advertising is in the crosshairs. Like many challenging discussions about digital advertising, transparency is at the heart of the issue.

Digital compliance for political ads

The proposed Honest Ads Act, a bipartisan effort to govern digital advertising according to the same rules followed by traditional broadcast media regarding political advertising, and is the one tangible fallout from the investigations.

The act calls for all politically-oriented digital ads to be declared at purchase, clearly labeled in the creative, and available for consumer access via a searchable interface. Among other things, the buyer must disclose their contact information, candidate and/or campaign, ad flight duration, number of impressions/views, and targeting criteria. The platform must collect this information and retain it for at least four years. It applies to digital platforms with at least 50 million unique visitors a month for the preceding 12-month period that have political ad buyers who spend at least $500 within a calendar year.

In a nutshell, it requires publishers know their ad buyers, ensure ads comply with (regulatory) policies and provide consumer access to these ads and any associated targeting criteria. Sounds familiar?

Transparency starts with the buyer

As The Media Trust announced a few short months ago, our Digital Vendor Risk Management (DVRM) platform provides real-time visibility and insight into non-compliant activity and threats operating in an enterprise website and mobile app environments. More than a risk management framework, DVRM operationalizes client-specific digital asset policies, continuously evaluates digital partner compliance, and actively facilitates the resolution of violating behavior.

The crux of this solution is the ability to identify and manage an enterprise’s digital ecosystem participants, from ad tech up to the source buyer, and authorize their presence. In addition to privacy regulation and escalating security concerns, the Honest Ads Act is just another reason why enterprises need to know their partners.

DVRM – A simple solution to a complex problem

Applying a political lens to DVRM it’s evident that the platform is already satisfying most of the requirements to enable transparency and accountability. Advertising supply chain partners register via an online portal; ads are uploaded and continuously scanned according to targeting criteria; client-specific policy violations are flagged; and, ads are stored for historical reference.

Self-regulation forces a new digital approach

Major platforms have announced their approaches to address congressional concerns and hopefully stave off the vote, let alone passage, of the Honest Ads Act. However, this self-regulation will need to extend to others meeting the requirement threshold, like ecommerce and media publishers.

Regardless of Honest Ads going to vote, changes are in the air. As an industry that has largely grown via self-regulation, the signals are obvious. It is incumbent upon the industry to embrace these changes, especially with the DVRM platform as an easy way to codify and operationalize your policies.

Webinar: Thriving Through GDPR

Turning Regulatory Obstacles into Opportunities

AdMonsters - Webinar 2017-1026

Watch today: https://www.admonsters.com/gdpr-webinar-recording/

Or, Access GDPR Webinar recording

Understanding and complying with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation is a challenge for any enterprise with consumer-facing websites and apps, especially Media publishers.

In this AdMonsters webinar, public policy consultant Nick Stringer details steps Ad/Revenue Operations teams should take to comply with GDPR and presents other looming regulatory issues

INFOGRAPHIC: Data Protection and Privacy Regulations

Your customer’s digital experience is powered by a range of third-party services not controlled by enterprise IT–ad blocker, advertising, analytics, content recommendation, data management, payments, social widgets, video players, and so much more. Increasingly, these services are proving to be a source of regulatory violations.

Download: Data Protection Infographic

TMT-DataPrivacy-FULL-Info

Getting serious about malvertising with TAG

Authored by Alex Calic, Chief Revenue Officer, The Media Trust

3 steps to anti-malware certification

cmyk TAG Certified Against Malware

Malware is a serious problem in the digital advertising ecosystem. Not only is it a contributing factor to ad blocking adoption, but also a significant driver of ad fraud. The World Federation of Advertisers estimates that the total cost of ad fraud could exceed $50B by 2025. Clearly, something must be done.

Various groups have attempted to address this malware problem with little success, but one group is taking decisive action. The Trustworthy and Accountability Group (TAG)—supported by the IAB—recently launched a malware certification program. As an inaugural certification recipient, The Media Trust is fully behind this initiative—just ask for program details.

The certification program is open to any entity that touches creative as it moves through the digital advertising ecosystem, from buyer to intermediary to seller. Even malware scanners like The Media Trust have the option to participate and commit to industry efforts for creating a healthier advertising supply chain.

Benefits: Reap what you sow

TAG’s “Certified Against Malware” seal is awarded to enterprises that can demonstrate adherence to rigorous anti-malware standards, especially those delineated in TAG’s Best Practices for Scanning Creative for Malware.

The program yields a host of benefits for publishers and their upstream partners. Specifically, participating companies can:

  • Improve their enterprise security posture: Adoption of continuous, 24/7, client-side scanning of digital advertising campaigns detects malware before it propagates to consumer devices.
  • Speed incident response: By allowing The Media Trust to send simultaneous alerts to you and your business partners, you reduce the time needed to resolve the issue across your entire advertising value chain.
  • Satisfy upstream partner requirements: Demonstrate compliance with advertiser and/or buyer directed policies for security.
  • Protect your brand value: Receive a “Certified Against Malware” seal from TAG to signal your enterprise’s efforts to identify and remediate malware in the digital ecosystem, a key element in many value propositions
  • Prove digital asset governance: Discovery and validation of all parties executing in your digital ecosystem supports enterprise-wide governance and risk frameworks.

Requirements: Steps to anti-malware certification

Anti-malware certification program participants promise to adhere to malware scanning best practices, make best efforts to identify and terminate malicious activity, and submit to a TAG-directed audit.

You, too, can join industry efforts by following these steps:

  1. Complete TAG registration: If not already a TAG-registered company, fill out the registration form, signal interest in malware certification (fees may apply), and designate both a TAG Compliance Officer and a primary malware point of contact. Indicate anticipated anti-malware certification path:
  • Self certify: Enterprise submits forms and documentation directly to TAG
  • Independent validation: Accredited audit firm or digital media auditor submits forms and documentation to TAG on the enterprise’s behalf
  1. Evaluate digital advertising ecosystem: To determine a reasonable scanning cadence, companies need to understand existing inventory flowing through the environment and the involvement of all upstream partners. Review existing inventory and assess typical volume by in-house, direct and programmatic; and, also consider the volume percentage by display, mobile, video, header bidding, etc.

Upstream partners should be identified and points of contact for security violations documented. Appraise each partner according to their history of addressing malware incidents, industry reputation and general relationship experience. Especially if a direct contract is not involved, discuss respective malware scanning responsibilities.

  1. Scan inventory: Implement malware scanning according to TAG’s Best Practices for Scanning Malware and document the entire processes. As a Certified Against Malware scanner, The Media Trust provides documentation on the scanning protocol for your environment including resolution procedure for malware incidents (Red Flag event).

NOTE: Watch this quick overview of TAG’s recommended scanning cadence.

Terminate malware: What are you waiting for?

The future of the digital ecosystem rests on everyone’s shoulder—advertiser, agency, ad tech and publisher. Let’s make it a better place. Verify your inventory is malware-free. The Media Trust can show you how—Just ask.